With Love & Beauty

I create things. I am a painter who embroiders, crochets, and dyes fabrics from natural dyes. These are my inspirations and thoughts. I'm currently attending Maryland Institute College of Art for my MFA in Community Art.

monikahschuschu:

Another old piece; cotton thread on a single layer of tulle in an embroidery hoop, almost appearing to just be floating in space. I should really make something like this again. 

monikahschuschu:

Another old piece; cotton thread on a single layer of tulle in an embroidery hoop, almost appearing to just be floating in space. I should really make something like this again. 

Angela Davis & Toni Morrison: How do we become whole...after traumas that threaten to splinter our souls?: On literacy, libraries, & liberation »

“Write it down, girl. Tell everyone how much it hurts. Sharing will make it easier to bear.” 
-Terri L. Jewell 

How do we become whole — again, or perhaps for the first time — after experiencing traumas that threaten to splinter our souls? How do we collect the shards of our broken selves that have been flung far and wide by the impact of life’s blows? How do we process individual and collective pains that have ripped apart our cores? Where do we find wellness, and to whom, or to what, do we turn when relief seems illusory? 

The road to recovery is meandering. It is even more twisted for those among us who are incarcerated, and who, often times, have landed behind bars because of behaviors triggered by our deep wounds and ugly scars. How, then, do the jailed build a sense of self within a structure that is designed to systematically demolish the remnants of dignity? This question provided the framework for a transformative workshop that I attended about a year ago, one of seemingly hundreds featured at the five-day US Social Forum in Detroit, MI. Organized by the California Coalition for Women Prisoners (CCWP), the event, “Community, Art and Transformative Justice: Healing and Resistance with Women and Transgender Prisoners,” served as a opportunity for former prisoners to communicate with the broader public about their struggle to attain mental and emotional health while confined, both literally and figuratively. CCWP staffers distributed the quarterly publication, The Fire Inside, featuring the art and writings of incarcerated women. The stories, sketches, and paintings contained in the magazine ran the gamut from heart-wrenching to heart-warming. I realized, as I absorbed the words and images shared, just how narrow the bottomless pit between sanity and madness is, how dependent on each other we are — and need to be — in order to shed the avoirdupois that threatens to submerge us in that finite space, and how reading and writing are floatation devices, imbued with the power to prevent us from drowning in that abyss.